Briefing | Horn of Africa fares poorly on Minority Rights

Minority Rights Group International (MRG) is a non-governmental organization working to secure the rights of ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities and indigenous peoples worldwide. It produces annually the Peoples Under Threatsurvey that identifies peoples or groups that are most under threat of genocide, mass killing or other systematic repression. It just released its survey for 2012 and the countries in the Horn of Africa scored especially low; four of them are among countries worldwide with peoples most under threat.

Somalia ranked #1 in both 2011 and 2012 with the groups most at risk being the Bantu, Benadiri and "caste" groups, and clan members at risk in fighting.

Sudan ranked #2 in both 2011 and 2012 with the groups most at risk including the Fur, Zaghawa, Massalit and others in Darfur, Dinka, Nuba and Beja.

South Sudan jumped from unranked in 2011 to #8 in 2012 with at risk groups including the Murle, Nuer, Dinka, Anuak, Jie and Kachipo. South Sudan had the sharpest rise in risk to minorities of all countries globally.

Ethiopia ranked #9 in 2012, a slight improvement from #8 in 2011 with at risk groups including the Anuak, Afars, Oromo, Somalis and smaller minorities.

Eritrea ranked #38 in 2012, a slight improvement from #37 in 2011 with at risk groups including the Afars, Saho, Tigre, and religious minorities.

Kenya ranked #46 in 2012, a significant improvement from #38 in 2011 with at risk groups including the Borana, Kalenjin, Kikuyu, Luyha, Luo, Muslims, Turkana, and Masai.

Djibouti ranked #49 in 2012, a modest worsening from #54 in 2011 with at risk groups including the Afar.

For the complete rankings and more information on this subject,click here.

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* Originally published on The Official Blog of Amb. David Shinn on May 28, 2012, and re-published in this blog with a written permission from the author.

* David Shinn, who served as US Ambassador to Ethiopia, is currently an Adjunct Professor at Elliott School Of International Affairs, George Washington University.

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